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This link is updated regularly and contains technical data supporting the role of fungi and their byproducts in the disease process.  The purpose of this link is twofold; 

1. Many physicians, nurses or other healthcare professionals want more information on the fungus link to serious illness prior to prescribing anti-fungal medications or recommending a dietary change for their patients.  The articles posted in this link are scientific and with few exceptions are taken from medical journals familiar to healthcare workers.  In the interest of brevity, Luke Curtis, MD, locates relevant articles and then extrapolates the information making review simple.  Of course, the entire article is also attached.

2. Many lay people ask us for technical data supporting the link between exposure to fungus and symptoms and diseases.  We encourage all visitors to this site to take some time and study these technical articles prior to initiating lifestyle changes, including dietary changes and to do so with their physician's awareness and approval.  Tens of thousands of scientific articles confirm a fungus or fungal byproduct link to disease.  Attached are more recent articles.
Aug, 23
2017
luke-curtis The effects of fungal infections are greatly underestimated.  Every year about one quarter of humans develop some sort of fungal infection.  Invasive fungal infections – especially from four genera- Candida, Aspergillus, Cryptococcus, and Pneumocystis- cause an estimated 1.5 million worldwide annual deaths 1-3.

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Jul, 10
2017
luke-curtis Cirrhosis of the liver is the 12th leading cause of death worldwide.  About half of all cirrhosis related deaths are due to excessive alcohol consumption.  Chronic heavy alcohol consumption can lead to can leak gut dysbiosis, a leaky gut and overgrowth of bacteria and fungi1 .

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Jul, 10
2017

Fungal Dysbiosis

luke-curtis Fungi or yeasts and molds have co-evolved with animals for hundreds of millions of years. Sometimes they cause adverse effects or dysbiosis. 

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Jul, 10
2017
luke-curtis A number of nutrients are used for controlling the growth of Candida in the mouth and gastrointestinal tract.  A recent review reported that a group of phytonutrients called flavonoids are very useful for controlling the growth of Candida in the lab and the digestive tract 1.  Some of these compounds with useful anti-Candida properties include the following: 

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Jun, 14
2017

Indoor Mold Exposure And Peripheral Neuropathy

luke-curtis Exposure to heavy growth of mold and bacteria in water damaged indoor environments can cause chronic health problems to the central nervous system (brain) including poorer concentration and memory, headaches, and depression (Kilburn, 2009) .

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