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This link is updated regularly and contains technical data supporting the role of fungi and their byproducts in the disease process.  The purpose of this link is twofold; 

1. Many physicians, nurses or other healthcare professionals want more information on the fungus link to serious illness prior to prescribing anti-fungal medications or recommending a dietary change for their patients.  The articles posted in this link are scientific and with few exceptions are taken from medical journals familiar to healthcare workers.  In the interest of brevity, Luke Curtis, MD, locates relevant articles and then extrapolates the information making review simple.  Of course, the entire article is also attached.

2. Many lay people ask us for technical data supporting the link between exposure to fungus and symptoms and diseases.  We encourage all visitors to this site to take some time and study these technical articles prior to initiating lifestyle changes, including dietary changes and to do so with their physician's awareness and approval.  Tens of thousands of scientific articles confirm a fungus or fungal byproduct link to disease.  Attached are more recent articles.
Dec, 17
2016

Coccidioidomycosis/ Valley Fever And Fatigue

luke-curtis “Valley Fever” is caused by fungi called Coccidioides imminits and posadasii which are endemic to Southwestern USA and Northwestern Mexico 1. Most cases (97%) in the US are in California or Arizona. Rates of Coccidioidomycosis have been increasingly in recent years, with an increase in California from 4.3 to 11.6 per 100,000/year from 2001 and 2010.  

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Dec, 17
2016
luke-curtis  Mycotoxins are a major risk to the food supply in many ways. Some especially bad foodborne mycotoxins are aflatoxins produced by Aspergillus flavus and several other Aspergillus species. Aflatoxins are some of the most potent carcinogens (cancer-causing chemicals) known.

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Nov, 17
2016
luke-curtis Several large studies have reported that sleep problems are significantly more common in indoor mold exposed patients as compared to unexposed controls. 

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Nov, 17
2016
luke-curtis (fungi) and their spores are found in a wide range of Earth environments. A recent study in the soil of Antarctica found viable spores from 11 mold taxa including the common indoor molds Aspergillus and Penicillium (Godinho, Goncalves et al. 2015).

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luke-curtis Many domestic animals such as cattle, hogs, horses, sheep, goats, turkey’s, and chickens can be made sick by eating mycotoxin (fungal toxins) contaminated grains, legumes (such as peanuts or soybeans), and grasses and other forage crops. 

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