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This link is updated regularly and contains technical data supporting the role of fungi and their byproducts in the disease process.  The purpose of this link is twofold; 

1. Many physicians, nurses or other healthcare professionals want more information on the fungus link to serious illness prior to prescribing anti-fungal medications or recommending a dietary change for their patients.  The articles posted in this link are scientific and with few exceptions are taken from medical journals familiar to healthcare workers.  In the interest of brevity, Luke Curtis, MD, locates relevant articles and then extrapolates the information making review simple.  Of course, the entire article is also attached.

2. Many lay people ask us for technical data supporting the link between exposure to fungus and symptoms and diseases.  We encourage all visitors to this site to take some time and study these technical articles prior to initiating lifestyle changes, including dietary changes and to do so with their physician's awareness and approval.  Tens of thousands of scientific articles confirm a fungus or fungal byproduct link to disease.  Attached are more recent articles.
Nov, 17
2016
luke-curtis (fungi) and their spores are found in a wide range of Earth environments. A recent study in the soil of Antarctica found viable spores from 11 mold taxa including the common indoor molds Aspergillus and Penicillium (Godinho, Goncalves et al. 2015).

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luke-curtis Many domestic animals such as cattle, hogs, horses, sheep, goats, turkey’s, and chickens can be made sick by eating mycotoxin (fungal toxins) contaminated grains, legumes (such as peanuts or soybeans), and grasses and other forage crops. 

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luke-curtis An excellent review of the effects of probiotics and Candida growth is provided in a recent issue in Clinical and Infectious Diseases. This review covered peer reviewed papers published from 2000 to 2015.

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Oct, 18
2016
luke-curtis Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) is a form of inflammatory lung disease mediated by inhaled allergen(s) and can progress to disabling or fatal lung disease. A number of different types of mold (fungi) and bacteria can trigger HP- as can exposure to birds, dusty food items such as flour and other types of dust. 

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Sep, 15
2016

Coconut Oil Useful For Controlling Candida

luke-curtis Many experts on controlling Candida, including Doug Kaufmann and Know the Cause, recommend using coconut and coconut oil to control Candida infections. Coconut and coconut oil contain several fatty acids including caprylic acid, capric acid, and lauric acid which inhibit growth of Candida and other yeasts (molds). Two recent studies have reported on the anti- Candida effects of coconut oil. 

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