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This link is updated regularly and contains technical data supporting the role of fungi and their byproducts in the disease process.  The purpose of this link is twofold; 

1. Many physicians, nurses or other healthcare professionals want more information on the fungus link to serious illness prior to prescribing anti-fungal medications or recommending a dietary change for their patients.  The articles posted in this link are scientific and with few exceptions are taken from medical journals familiar to healthcare workers.  In the interest of brevity, Luke Curtis, MD, locates relevant articles and then extrapolates the information making review simple.  Of course, the entire article is also attached.

2. Many lay people ask us for technical data supporting the link between exposure to fungus and symptoms and diseases.  We encourage all visitors to this site to take some time and study these technical articles prior to initiating lifestyle changes, including dietary changes and to do so with their physician's awareness and approval.  Tens of thousands of scientific articles confirm a fungus or fungal byproduct link to disease.  Attached are more recent articles.
May, 08
2012

More Good Data on Probiotic Bacteria

luke-curtis

Probiotic or “Good” Bacteria such as Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium have been shown to reduce the risk of bacterial or fungal infections in the intestines.  Probiotic bacteria have been used for decades to fight off harmful Candida molds (yeasts) in the intestines.   Probiotics have also been shown to reduce risk of skin and food allergies and reduce risk of “leaky gut”.  

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May, 08
2012
luke-curtis

“Friendly” bacteria like Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus can significantly reduce the risk of gastrointestinal infections like severe diarrhea in children.  Breast milk also contains small amounts of probiotic bacteria, and breast fed infants have generally lower infection rates than bottle fed infants

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luke-curtis

Flooding, water leakage and wet indoor conditions stimulate growth of mold (fungi) and bacteria.  Many types of molds and bacteria can grow on building materials like wood, drywall, carpeting and stored human food.

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It is critical that all physicians, nurses, and visitors wash their hands every time they see a patient to prevent spread of bacteria, molds and viruses.  Hospital acquired infections kill 100,000 US patients annually in the USA.  Many infectious microorganisms such as Methacillin Resistant Staphyloccus aureus (MRSA), Vancomycin Resistant Enteroccoci (VRE), and Closteridium difficile are resistant to many antibiotics.  In the USA, rates of hospital acquired MRSA infections increased 3 fold in the period 1995-2005.

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May, 08
2012
luke-curtis

Inulin is a form of the sugar fructose in which the fructose molecules are bound together in long chains called polymers.  Inulin is found in Jerusalem artichoke, chicory and members of the Allium family such as onions, garlic, leeks and chives.  Inulin is also available as a food supplement.   (Note that inulin is almost the same word as insulin.)

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