science-of-fungus-554px

This link is updated regularly and contains technical data supporting the role of fungi and their byproducts in the disease process.  The purpose of this link is twofold; 

1. Many physicians, nurses or other healthcare professionals want more information on the fungus link to serious illness prior to prescribing anti-fungal medications or recommending a dietary change for their patients.  The articles posted in this link are scientific and with few exceptions are taken from medical journals familiar to healthcare workers.  In the interest of brevity, Luke Curtis, MD, locates relevant articles and then extrapolates the information making review simple.  Of course, the entire article is also attached.

2. Many lay people ask us for technical data supporting the link between exposure to fungus and symptoms and diseases.  We encourage all visitors to this site to take some time and study these technical articles prior to initiating lifestyle changes, including dietary changes and to do so with their physician's awareness and approval.  Tens of thousands of scientific articles confirm a fungus or fungal byproduct link to disease.  Attached are more recent articles.
May, 08
2012

Smoking Increases Risk of Psychological Stress

luke-curtis

It has long been known that smoking can increase risk of heart disease, strokes, asthma, emphysema and many forms of cancer.   Smoking may also increase the risk of psychological distress as well.

Read more...

May, 08
2012

Sugar Containing Beverages and Obesity

luke-curtis

In the past several decades, average US consumption of refined sugars such as cane and beet sugar, corn syrup and honey has increased for both children and adults. The average adult now eats more than 400 calories a day of refined sugars. These sugars are “empty calories” which contain few nutrients but may increase the risk of becoming overweight and getting type 2 diabetes.

Read more...

May, 08
2012

Second Hand Smoke, Molds and Sinus Congestion

luke-curtis

About 10 to 15% of the population suffers from chronic sinus congestion or rhinosinusitis.  Environmental factors like second hand tobacco smoke, pollen and molds can greatly increase risk of sinusitis.  Oftentimes, sinus problems are worse during certain times of the year, such as the early spring tree pollen season.

Read more...

luke-curtis

A number of previous studies have reported that consuming probiotic or “good bacteria” like Lactobacillusor Bifidobacterium can reduce the risk of many bacterial intestinal infections such as Closteridium difficule or Vancomycin Resistant Enterococci.  Such probiotic bacteria can also reduce risk of infections in places other than the digestive tract as well.

Read more...

May, 08
2012

More Good Data on Probiotic Bacteria

luke-curtis

Probiotic or “Good” Bacteria such as Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium have been shown to reduce the risk of bacterial or fungal infections in the intestines.  Probiotic bacteria have been used for decades to fight off harmful Candida molds (yeasts) in the intestines.   Probiotics have also been shown to reduce risk of skin and food allergies and reduce risk of “leaky gut”.  

Read more...