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This link is updated regularly and contains technical data supporting the role of fungi and their byproducts in the disease process.  The purpose of this link is twofold; 

1. Many physicians, nurses or other healthcare professionals want more information on the fungus link to serious illness prior to prescribing anti-fungal medications or recommending a dietary change for their patients.  The articles posted in this link are scientific and with few exceptions are taken from medical journals familiar to healthcare workers.  In the interest of brevity, Luke Curtis, MD, locates relevant articles and then extrapolates the information making review simple.  Of course, the entire article is also attached.

2. Many lay people ask us for technical data supporting the link between exposure to fungus and symptoms and diseases.  We encourage all visitors to this site to take some time and study these technical articles prior to initiating lifestyle changes, including dietary changes and to do so with their physician's awareness and approval.  Tens of thousands of scientific articles confirm a fungus or fungal byproduct link to disease.  Attached are more recent articles.
May, 16
2012

Preventing and Treating Candida Skin Infections

luke-curtis

Candida is a yeast (mold or fungus) which frequently grows in the intestines of humans.   Candida can kill off good bacteria in the intestines.  Candida in the intestines can also produce significant amount of ethanol (beverage alcohol), acetaldehyde (a toxic chemical) and a number of highly allergenic (allergy causing) proteins.

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May, 08
2012

Indoor Allergen Research

luke-curtis

A number of indoor mammals, birds and crustaceans can produce proteins which can cause allergies and worsen asthma in sensitive people.  Dust mites, cockroaches, birds, mice, rats, cats, dogs, horses, pigs and cattle all produce allergens in their droppings, salvia, skin, fur or feathers.   Exposure to these allergens have been linked to higher skin test reactivity and higher rates of asthma and wheezing.

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May, 08
2012

Houseplants Remove Indoor Air Pollutants

luke-curtis

Trees and other outdoor plants play a major role in producing oxygen, absorbing carbon dioxide and reducing levels of many types of air pollutants. If you have the space, planting trees is a good way to improve the environment, reduce carbon dioxide buildup and provide habitat for many birds and small mammals. In addition, fruit or nut trees can also provide many years of delicious and nutritious food.

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May, 08
2012

Smoking Increases Risk of Psychological Stress

luke-curtis

It has long been known that smoking can increase risk of heart disease, strokes, asthma, emphysema and many forms of cancer.   Smoking may also increase the risk of psychological distress as well.

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May, 08
2012

Sugar Containing Beverages and Obesity

luke-curtis

In the past several decades, average US consumption of refined sugars such as cane and beet sugar, corn syrup and honey has increased for both children and adults. The average adult now eats more than 400 calories a day of refined sugars. These sugars are “empty calories” which contain few nutrients but may increase the risk of becoming overweight and getting type 2 diabetes.

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