Jun, 28
2012

Mental Problems - Innate or Ingested?

Michael Smith Blog - Know The Cause The New York Daily News reports this story; a young man stabs a child 5 times before being detained. The attack was premeditated. The perpetrator is currently under psychiatric surveillance, and while 23 year old Evan Sachs has no criminal record, he is on five different medications.



Yahoo News reports that cannabis users are more likely to experience mental health problems. While cannabis has been proven to be an effective pain reliever and to have some medicinal properties, it is a drug nonetheless with psychoactive side effects.

These two stories aren't related per se, but they underscore a point I believe is worth making. Where do mental problems originate? Do we get the same tired meme from medicine that we get for cancer, diabetes and the plethora of other diseases of "unknown" origin? It's in your your genes; you don't have any control over the way your brain works. Or does our mental health have something to do with the substances, maybe even the food, we ingest?

I love the story Doug tells on the air about the conversation he had with a physician who purported that food doesn't effect mood. Doug's challenge - drink a six pack of beer and tell me how your mood changes. Furthermore, how do you feel the next morning? Food can affect how you feel, and how you feel can affect what you crave and ultimately what you eat. There have been numerous studies done on this and the link is confirmed.

Doug makes a great case in his Fungus Link series for fungus being the source of mental disfunction. Fungi can parasitize man and can influence cravings for sugar and starch, the food sources they need to survive. If diet can feed fungus, it can also starve fungus. Logic follows that a Phase 1 diet might be effective in remedying mental problems. Please look into the beneficial effects of fish oil for brain health as well.

Mental problems are a very serious medical condition, and no one at KTC would suggest you use this information in lieu of a doctor visit. But after making sure you are in no immediate danger and getting his or her professional opinion, why not try a change in diet for depression? It beats the potential dangers of taking powerful drugs.

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